3 Tips On Creating Lens Flare With No Sun

How do you achieve a lens flare when there’s no sun? In this video, I show you how to accomplish this look using just one off-camera flash to create a unique lens flare. It took a lot of playing around with different setups to get a very natural-looking lens flare but once I did it became a technique that I was able to reproduce quickly on shoots and at weddings. You can read the full article HERE.

Filmed by Matt Mahoney. This video is about how I use one single off-camera flash to re-create real lens flare when the sun has either went down already or simply doesn't want to come out from behind the clouds.

Twisted Preset 4th of July SALE!

Happy 4th of July!

$50 off SALE!

I wanted to help everyone celebrate Independence Day with a $50 Discount Code to use on the LR + ASE Preset Bundle, bringing the total down to $100. There is an update coming which you will receive for free adding one more color preset, one more B&W preset, and a few more adjustment presets. Here is a blog post that I edited completely with the Twisted Preset system, which is a look that you can get in just a few clicks.

CARLA + CHRIS (Twisted Oaks Wedding)

The great about this system is that you can get a look that is much more vibrant and brighter with just a few different clicks if that is your style. There will also be more tutorial videos coming soon!

*Please use Discount Code “JULY4” when checking out*

CAMP RESET V.2 - ITHACA, NY

EARLY BIRD SPECIAL GOOD UNTIL JULY 14TH

$750

Includes lodging with 3 meals

3 days of learning with myself, Jason Vinson, and Bud Johnson.


 
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Camp Reset was created with the idea of placing importance on taking time for yourself as a business owner, since it is rarely realized in a small company. Along with continuing to learn and educate yourself, it’s just as important to set aside time to recharge, take a deep breath, and see where you and your business are in order to make necessary improvements and to invest in new ideas.

Join Jay Cassario, Jason Vinson, and Bud Johnson on an intimate and epic experience designed to inspire the hell out of you through gaining insight into their vision and shooting techniques. The three of them will inspire you through their love for their craft, their artistic and creative approach, while also being complete open books sharing everything they know with nothing held back. You’ll be spending three days with other like-minded creatives who are all looking to do the same exact thing you are, to be inspired and grow as photographers and artists while making new friends along the way. That’s what workshops like this are all about, an experience that changes you not only as a photographer, but as a person.

LEARN MORE…

HOW I SHOT IT - VALLEY FORGE PHOTO

Learning to get out of your own way…


That phrase really is the best way to describe how I created this shot. This was taken after the sun had already dropped down below the tree line at a beautiful venue in the Valley Forge Historical Park, called The Philander Chase Knox Estate. It’s a venue that I’ve shot at 5 or 6 times now over the past 3 years. The spot that I took these three photos is one that I’ve literally stared at more times than I can remember, simply trying to figure out a creative way of shooting it. It’s a simple man-made pond with a brick walk-way surrounding it. On one end, up near the estate, there’s a little area made of brick that was probably built by hand in the 1700’s, with a small water fountain and concrete statue. On the other end, if you look closely at the photo below, you can see there’s a concrete lined canal or or waterway that leads down to a river. There’s an identical concrete canal on the estate side as well which is a little easier to see in the cell phone photos I had the venue send me. Each canal was made of concrete and had about 6 inches of water running through them.


In the past, I’ve shot photos using reflections from the pond and other similar shots with the estate in the background but nothing that I’ve ever really been happy with. Each time I walk out the back door of the estate it looks at me and screams that there’s creative ways to shoot it which absolutely drives me crazy because until this past wedding, it’s only left me scratching my head.

So, what was the difference this time? Before I took any gear out of my bags, I walked out back and looked at it as if it were the very first time. I forced myself to forget all of the other ideas I’ve had that didn’t work, or simply weren’t all that creative. I’m sure some of you experience this as well, but I have a bad habit of going through the same creative thought process over and over again. Going through the same mental steps that for the most part have treated me pretty good over the years. Well, breaking that process can be pretty challenging but I was hoping that it would be what I needed to finally create something artistic that my clients would love and I would be happy with.

 
 

I walked around the entire pond, looked at it from different angles, but blocked out any thoughts of gear or lighting (both natural and artificial), and within just a few minutes had a brand new idea in my head. I squatted down about 15 feet down the concrete canal between the pond and the stream and had a pretty good vision of what I wanted to capture and how I wanted to do it. Later that night just as the sun went down, I set the shot up, took a couple of test shots and was ready to go.

As much as I feel confident in my creative thought process that I typically use, I’ve been trying more and more to switch things up and break it now. This is the shot I’ve known was there all along, I just had to find it... with new eyes.

FEARLESS PHOTOGRAPHERS - Right On Awards

I simply placed the bride and groom exactly where I wanted them (right in front of the brick wall up near the estate) and asked them to take a few minutes to themselves away from all the excitement. I brought two camera/lens combos with me as I walked around to the other side of the pond and basically laid down over top of the water canal leading down to the stream. There was a concrete ledge about 6 inches wide on each side where I was able to put my knees and elbows.

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The first couple shots I took using the Leica SL and 50mm Summilux M-mount because I specifically wanted to use a little lens flare to help add that little something extra to the composition and draw the viewer’s attention right where I wanted it. I had an AD200 strobe up near the estate, behind the brick wall, about 6 feet above the bride and groom. It was aimed right at me with a Magmod grid and full CTO (my setup for creating lens flare when I don’t have the sun). From my test shot below, you can see how there isn’t a lot of separation between my wife and the brick wall, so I wanted to add another light to create a little more. I put an AD600 strobe right behind the bride and groom, about chest height so that it wouldn’t be too much work to edit out, and I aimed it right at the wall behind them. This brightened the wall and gave me the separation I wanted to see, really making them stand out.

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It only took me 3 shots to get the photo I was looking for and the lens flare exactly how I wanted it. I then had Sandi move the AD200 and move it off to the side a little so it wasn’t directly behind the couple anymore. I switched to the SL and 90mm setup and took a few shots. That was it, done.

The first shot below was taken with the 90mm and the black and white photo was taken with the 50mm, only I turned off the AD200 and only triggered the AD600.

Leica SL  +  Leica 50mm Summilux  | Only the AD600 behind the bride and groom

Leica SL + Leica 50mm Summilux | Only the AD600 behind the bride and groom


GEAR

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COMING SOON:

I just filmed a video tutorial on how I create that beautiful golden hour sun using just one light (GoDox AD200) and what I use to get the awesome lens flare you see in the shot above. It’s all in the light, the lens, and the way that I shoot it, none of the lens flare you see in my photos is created in post.

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Chasing The Light

Shot entirely with the Leica SL and the 50mm Summilux f/1.4 ASPH M-Mount with the Leica adaptor. I had brought my M10P to shoot as well but didn’t realize the battery was dead and the spare was back at the studio on the charger. The last shoot that I did with Katt, I had a very specific vision in mind and not only did the location that we had planned on shooting at fall through, but I my goal of shooting all natural light didn’t pan out either. This time, we decided to give it another go, but about 10 minutes after we started shooting the sun dipped behind the clouds and never came back out. We plan on shooting again in a couple weeks to hopefully get the shots that we had originally set out to get, but also to get some shots to finish up my review and comparison of the Leica 50mm Summilux M-mount and SL-Mount.